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Content Samples

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  • Bruce Lawson
    B
  • Vadim Makeev
    V
11 min read
dev.opera.com

Progressive Web Apps: the future of Apps

On 26 March, I gave a presentation at iWeb Summit 2016 in Taipei about Progressive Web Apps. Here’s the 20 minute video. If you don’t like my voice, just see the slides. More resources Non-technical guide to HTML Manifest that I wrote for .net magazine Manifest generator New Progressive Web App helps Flipkart boost conversions 70% and other business benefits of PWAs. Installable Web Apps and Add to Home screen: a longer tutorial on how to make a Progressive Web App. Progressive Web App install banners come to Opera for Android List of...

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Opera Mini 11 for Android’s new compression mode

Today, we released Opera Mini 11 for Android. It has two modes. By default, it starts in Extreme-compression mode. This is the traditional Opera Mini compression that can reduce a site down to 10% of its original size, using the Opera Presto rendering engine on a proxy server. As always, this means a trade-off between experience and speed. Some sites may render differently, and some JavaScript won’t function as you expect. (Read more about Opera Mini and JavaScript and Making websites that work well on Opera Mini.) High-compression mode This...

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Houdini Task Force meeting report

Houdini is a joint W3C Technical Architecture Group and CSS Working Group initiative to specify hooks into existing CSS. Its primary aim isn’t to give us “new CSS” but to add API hooks into the browsers’ built-in CSS capability so developers can hook into it, use the native implementation where we want (rather than duplicate it) and extend it. It’s applying the Extensible Web Manifesto’s philosophy to CSS. (If you’d like to know more about the aims and back story, read Sex, Houdini and the Extensible Web by Brian Kardell.) The...

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On PPK’s moratorium on new browser features

Famed developer and commentator Peter Paul Koch (PPK) recently called for “a moratorium on new browser features for about a year or so”. If you haven’t read his article Stop pushing the web forward, give it a look; he raises interesting points, as he always does. (Let us say now: we’re all big fans of PPK; he’s undergone personal attacks for his article — we’re going to disagree with his central thesis, while continuing to love him deeply, and thanking him for starting this discussion.) In many ways, we Opera devrel folks feel...

dev.opera.com

On PPK’s moratorium on new browser features

Famed developer and commentator Peter Paul Koch (PPK) recently called for “a moratorium on new browser features for about a year or so”. If you haven’t read his article Stop pushing the web forward, give it a look; he raises interesting points, as he always does. (Let us say now: we’re all big fans of PPK; he’s undergone personal attacks for his article — we’re going to disagree with his central thesis, while continuing to love him deeply, and thanking him for starting this discussion.) In many ways, we Opera devrel folks feel...

dev.opera.com

Installable Web Apps and Add to Home screen

Please note: this article is superseded by Installable Web Apps and Add to Home screen because the functionality described was released in Opera 32 for Android. Today, we’re excited to release a special labs build of Opera for Android with an experimental new feature, called “Add to Home screen”, which you can find when clicking the small plus button on the left of the address bar. When a user clicks “Add to Home screen” after loading your site in Opera, a shortcut to your site is placed on the Home screen of their device, allowing...

  • Andreas Bovens
    A
  • Bruce Lawson
    B
3 min read
dev.opera.com

Making websites that work well on Opera Mini

I recently gave a keynote talk at Velocity conference called “Ensuring a Performant Web for the Next Billion People” about the importance of developing economies and their use of proxy browsers such as Opera Mini. Slides are available and here’s the 20 minute YouTube video made by the organisers. The most common question I got in the hallways was “How can I make my site work well in Opera Mini?”. The answer is simple: use the development methodology known as Progressive Enhancement. Progressive Enhancement Progressive Enhancement...

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Opera’s work to reduce Chromium’s memory use

In his recent blogpost marking ten years of Opera Mini, PM Christian Uribe wrote: Our vision is still the same: get the web into the hands of everyone, regardless of their device. That vision is shared throughout Opera. The vast majority of the world isn’t using the latest greatest laptop or smartphone (for example, we know from the Google I/O 2015 keynote that over a quarter of new Android devices have only 512 MB of RAM) so one of the projects that our engineers are working on is improving the memory use of Chromium processes. Blink...

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Opera Mini server upgrade

We’ve upgraded our Opera Mini servers to a new version of our Presto rendering engine. This means that CSS Flexbox and layouts depending on rem units will now display as you expect. As you may know, Opera Mini renders pages on Opera’s servers which are then sent, in a highly compressed format, to clients on devices. This means that all users will see pages rendered using the updated Mini servers, with no need to update their software. 260 million users upgraded automatically, in one weekend. Wow. What’s new HTML5 Parser The Mini servers...

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Opera goes to BlinkOn 3

Recently, the Opera Web Technology team attended BlinkOn 3, the twice-yearly conference for Blink contributors. (Videos are available on YouTube.) As you may know, Opera is a prolific committer to Blink, and has the only non-Google API owner and Chromium Security Group members. Here are a few notes and observations from our team. Mobile first? A year ago, a “mobile first” policy was formed. Now that has been replaced by a policy about enabling web developers to do whatever they want. Part of that is to keep landing new APIs that give more...