feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Record-high Arctic freshwater will flow to Labrador Sea, affecting local and global oceans

The Arctic Ocean's Beaufort Sea has increased its freshwater content by 40 percent over the past two decades. When conditions change this freshwater will travel to the Labrador Sea off Canada, rather than through the wider marine passageways that connect to seas in Northern Europe. This has implications for local marine environments and global ocean circulation.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

New study suggests supermassive black holes could form from dark matter

A new theoretical study has proposed a novel mechanism for the creation of supermassive black holes from dark matter. The international team find that rather than the conventional formation scenarios involving 'normal' matter, supermassive black holes could instead form directly from dark matter in high density regions in the centres of galaxies. The result has key implications for cosmology in the early Universe.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

How did dogs get to the Americas? An ancient bone fragment holds clues

Researchers analyzed the dog's mitochondrial genome, and concluded that the animal belonged to a lineage of dogs whose evolutionary history diverged from that of Siberian dogs as early as 16,700 years ago. The timing of that split coincides with a period when humans may have been migrating into North America along a coastal route that included Southeast Alaska.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Touchdown! NASA's Mars Perseverance rover safely lands on Red Planet

The largest, most advanced rover NASA has sent to another world touched down on Mars Thursday, after a 203-day journey traversing 293 million miles (472 million kilometers). About the size of a car, the robotic geologist and astrobiologist will undergo several weeks of testing before it begins its two-year science investigation of Mars' Jezero Crater. A fundamental part of its mission is astrobiology, including the search for signs of...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes

A global team of researchers set out to understand how human-made noise affects wildlife, from invertebrates to whales, in the oceans, and found overwhelming evidence that marine fauna, and their ecosystems, are negatively impacted by noise. This noise disrupts their behavior, physiology, reproduction and, in extreme cases, causes mortality. The researchers call for human-induced noise to be considered a prevalent stressor at the...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

'Where did I park my car?' Brain stimulation improves mental time travel

In a new study, scientists improved memory of complex, realistic events by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the brain network responsible for memory. The researchers then had participants watch videos of realistic activities to measure how memory works during everyday tasks. The findings prove it is possible to measure and manipulate realistic types of memory.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Primordial black holes and the search for dark matter from the multiverse

Astronomers are studying black holes that could have formed in the early universe, before stars and galaxies were born. Such primordial black holes (PBHs) could account for all or part of dark matter, be responsible for some of the observed gravitational waves signals, and seed supermassive black holes found in the center of our Galaxy and other galaxies.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Neuroscientists isolate promising mini antibodies against COVID-19 from a llama

Researchers have isolated a set of promising, tiny antibodies, or 'nanobodies,' against SARS-CoV-2 that were produced by a llama named Cormac. Preliminary results suggest that at least one of these nanobodies, called NIH-CoVnb-112, could prevent infections and detect virus particles by grabbing hold of SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins. In addition, the nanobody appeared to work equally well in either liquid or aerosol form, suggesting it...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Climate change: Threshold for dangerous warming will likely be crossed between 2027-2042

The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042 -- a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052. Researchers introduce a new and more precise way to project the Earth's temperature. Based on historical data, it considerably reduces uncertainties compared to previous approaches.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

COVID-19 virus enters the brain, research strongly suggests

The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a new study, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The spike proteins alone can cause brain fog. Since the spike protein enters the brain, the virus also is likely to cross into the brain.