paulhammant

Pull-Request dissatisfaction

A high-throughput team in Git is going to commit & push often, and teammates are going to need to code review as changes come in. Well, they do if they want to prevent the accumulation of tech debt, latent defects, standards avoidance, etc. When at ThoughtWorks I was placed at Google in the Test Mercenaries team up to the start of 2009, so I’ve some perspectives that are ten years out of date now, but I’ll give it a go of trying to detail the experience differences. Google’s setup was a couple of years established internally before...

paulhammant

Some Thoughts On Toggles

Kent Beck was asking about “Feature Flags” on Twitter recently and their life cycle. Former colleague, Pete Hodgson linked back to an article he’d written to for Martin Fowler a couple of years ago, and added context. I don’t think this article fits in that Tweet series, so it’s a standalone blog entry - much of which I’ve shared before. Build-time toggles Some toggles shape what is built - things are included or excluded from binaries (JARs, DLLs, EXEs, APKs, etc) Also known as “build-flags” and they have a multi-decade...

paulhammant

Using Git In Business And Government

Synopsis: Git is the best we have right now for a “History-retaining Merkle tree” (when force-push is turned off), and stands to be utilized more outside of software development - in business at least. A £200m “Garden Bridge” project was canceled when it had accrued £50m in costs and before construction started. It is difficult to pick it apart. See this Tortoise Media article and Reddit discussion. It is not clear whether governments or corporate shareholders would be first to require “minutes” and proceedings to be better...