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Adventurer plans to drive EV from South Pole to North Pole

When people think of the world’s toughest vehicles, an electric car doesn’t spring to mind. But rugged U.K. adventurer Chris Ramsey is planning to cover 17,000 miles from the South Pole to the magnetic North Pole in electric vehicles. Ramsey has been planning his upcoming journey for four years. The route will take him across 14 countries and three continents, in temperatures expected to range from -30°C to 28°C (-22°F to...

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Biden pushes to expand offshore wind energy

On Monday, President Biden announced that he intends for the U.S. electricity sector to be carbon neutral by 2035. His sights are set on lots of wind energy and lots of jobs. Later this year, the Interior Department intends to begin selling leases for a new wind energy area between the Jersey coast and Long Island. These relatively shallow waters are known as the New York Bight. The project is called Ocean Wind. A 2020 study by the...

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Toxic chemicals report card grades top retailers

When most people swing by the store to pick up a few items, they aren’t aware that they are basically entering a minefield of toxic chemicals. But the fifth annual Who’s Minding the Store? retailer report card reveals which major retailers are safer and which ones should probably be entered only after donning hazmat suits. Toxic-Free Future is behind the Mind the Store campaign. It’s been publishing chemical report cards since...

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Tidal turbines power electric vehicles on Scotland's Yell Island

As countries around the world increasingly embrace electric vehicles, charging is top of mind. In Scotland, the island of Yell is powering its EVs with tidal energy. Nova Innovation has built an underwater network of revolving tidal turbines anchored to the ocean floor. You can’t see them from above, and they’re designed to pose no navigational hazards. One thing is for sure about Yell — there’s plenty of ocean around it, so...

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Major banks still back fossil fuel industry despite climate pledges

Banks are taking greenwashing to a whole new level. Despite climate-conscious PR, they are still putting their money toward financing fossil fuel projects, according to the new Banking on Climate Chaos report. In the last five years, while acceptance of climate change has gone more mainstream, the 60 largest commercial and private investment banks in the world financed the fossil fuel industry to a tune of nearly $4 trillion. At the...

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Florida cracks down on reptile pet trade

Florida’s warm temperatures and lush flora help new residents thrive — but some of those transplants are eating the very ecosystem that’s sustaining them. And we’re not talking about New Yorkers. No, certain newbies of the herpetological kind have become reptiles non grata, and Florida is saying “no more.” Last month, the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission unanimously decided to ban possession and breeding of a...

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From Reddit investors to wildlife conservationists

Gorillas, pangolins and other endangered animals are getting help from a surprising source: small traders who benefited in this year’s famous GameStop event. Many have donated stock market gains to conservation groups. The biggest winners? Gorillas. In normal times, the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund may get 20 new adoption pledges (this is a sponsorship deal — the gorillas do not come to live with you) during a weekend. But more than...

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Virginia bans cosmetic testing on animals

Starting January 1, 2022, the state of Virginia will no longer allow animal testing or the sale of cosmetics tested on animals. Thanks to Virginia Governor Ralph Northam — and other kind and dedicated Virginians — the Virginia Humane Cosmetics Act became law this month. Senator Jennifer Boysko and Delegate Kaye Kory introduced the bill. Its passage makes Virginia the fourth state in the U.S. to make a law prohibiting cosmetic...

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Carbfix turns emissions into stone

An Icelandic startup has an intriguing solution to the emissions problem: turn carbon into stone. While it sounds like an evil power out of a fairy tale, and maybe there is a little bit of magic to Carbfix’s approach, we’ll assume its proprietary technology is scientific. Here’s how it works. As most of us know, trees and plants bind carbon from the atmosphere. But, so do rocks. Carbfix’s technology just makes the process of...