The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K was something of a sleeper hit. It’s a camera built for videography. It has a slick and slim design which makes it compact, easy to use, and carry around. Have you ever considered, what’s the best lens for BMPCC?

As its name suggests, the camera can shoot in 4K and the footage it produces is seriously great looking.

Like any other camera, to get the most out of it, you’ll have to invest in lenses. This brings with it a plethora of questions.

More so than with Canon cameras. Blackmagic isn’t a lens manufacturer so you’ll have to rely on third-party support.

Olympus and Sigma are the leaders of this race. But even then you’ll need to know what types of lens you need to get.

Therefore, we decided to compile a guide on the best lenses for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

We’re going to list some of the best lenses you can buy. We’ll also mention some things you’ll want to consider before buying a lens for your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

Best Lens For BMPCC (Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera)

Let’s check out some of the best cameras on the market and why they’re worth your time and money.

1. Sigma Art 18-35mm 1.8

You’ll be hard-pressed to look up the best lenses for the 4K without finding at least one person recommending the Sigma Art 18-35mm 1.8.

This is not without a good reason. Sigma shot up from a company making budget versions of premium devices to one of the leaders of lens manufacturing.

Their track record in recent times is so impressive that their lenses beat the first party-made ones.

Their Art series of lenses is a perfect example of the brand’s high quality. The lens boasts a hefty price tag.

However, it’s easy to see where Sigma’s creation deserves each penny. They made a versatile lens that will stay with you for a long time.

Buying this lens feels like getting three prime lenses in a single zoom lens. That’s the benchmark set by Sigma here.

The 18-35mm focal length covers a range-wide enough to get you anything from super wide establishing shots to more intimate dialogue shots.

The 1.8 aperture helps keep the lens quiet in low-light situations.

If you own a Blackmagic 4K or 6K this is the lens you’ll need first in your kit. Even its hefty price justifies buying for the versatility factor.

With the Sigma Art 18-35mm 1.8, you won’t need another lens for a long, long time.

Sale
Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 Art DC HSM Lens for Canon, Black (210101)
  • F1.8 maximum aperture
  • F16 minimum
  • Ring-type ultrasonic-type AF motor with full-time manual focusing, 72mm filter size
  • Minimum focusing distance 28 cm/ 11.0 in. USB Dock compatible, MC-11 compatible.
  • Available in Canon EF (EF-S), Sony Alpha (dot), Nikon f (DX) mounts
$799.00 −$100.01 $698.99
View on Amazon

2. Sigma 50-100mm f/1.8

Our next choice is a lens that goes a bit over the 1000 mark but we think that’s fine. Another release in Sigma’s Art series.

Much like the 18-35mm, this lens offers an equally impressive build quality. It’s also just as sharp in terms of image quality.

Going up all the way to 100mm, this lens only reaches the low end of a telephoto.

However, you have to keep in mind that the lens maintains a fast f/1.8 aperture regardless of where you are on the focal range.

So if you want a lens for your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera that offers a high focal length but maintains a fast aperture this is the one for you.

There are simply no lenses that offer this kind of performance on the market.

Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 Art DC HSM Lens for Canon
  • Covering three very popular short tele focal lengths when crop factor is considered 85mm, 105mm, and...
  • As an Art lens, the sharpness, even wide open, will rival primes while offering .
  • expected to be widely popular with both still photographers and videographers
$999.00
View on Amazon

3. Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8

The Pocket 6K does not offer continuous autofocus. It makes sense it’s a cinema camera. This is bad news for videographers using Gimbals since the slightest touch to the camera or lens will imbalance the Gimbal.

For all gimbal losers who want to use the Pocket 6K with continuous autofocus, the Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 might be of interest.

Currently, this lens is the sole ultra-wide-angle zoom lens at an f/2.8 speed. This line of lenses was released back in 2010.

Thanks to its undying popularity, this lens has received a number of updated releases by Tokina. The third release is the best yet.

Thanks to the ultra-wide field of view, the Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 you’ll only have to deal with a very short minimum focus distance.

For this reason, you can use a Gimbal with this lens and have no problem moving around with no worries about the camera losing focus.

Overall, if you’re looking for an ultra-wide-angle lens for your Pocket 6K that’ll help you maintain autofocus without any hassle, this is for you.

Gimbal enthusiasts should also be pleased with the Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 performance.

TOKINA ATX-i 11-16mm F2.8 Canon EF
  • New design & lens coating for better perfromances
$399.00
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4. Rokinon 100mm F2.8 ED UMC

If you’re looking to use your Pocket camera for taking portraits and shooting close-ups, Rokinon may have something in store for you.

While their names may sound like a deceptively Canon soundalike, Rokinon has actually been releasing quality glass for years.

The company’s Rokinon 100mm f2.8 ED UMC is an excellent lens that’s bound to offer an amazing experience for anyone looking into getting high-quality shots out of their Blackmagic Pocket camera.

Thanks to the circular 9-blade diaphragm, the lens offers this beautiful Bokeh effect when using it. It’s bound to grant videographers plenty of beautiful and creative shots.

The lens especially surprises with its performance, giving only the slightest signs of flare and ghosting. This is thanks to an anti-reflective ultra multi-coating.

In closing, the Rokinon 100mm f2.8 ED UMC is an excellent lens that’s guaranteed to deliver great results for videographers.

Just be mindful of the distance between you and the subject since this lens has no autofocus.

Rokinon 100mm F2.8 ED UMC Full Frame Telephoto Macro Lens for Fuji X Interchangeable Lens Cameras
  • Compatible with all Fuji X interchangeable cameras and features a 16.4 degree angle of view
  • Constructed of 15 Glass Elements in 12 Groups and boasts a minimum focusing distance of only 1.0 ft.
  • Aperture range of f/2.8 - f/32 with 9 diaphragm blades
  • Ultra Multi-Coated (UMC) Glass
  • Includes lens caps, removable lens hood, lens pouch, instruction manual & 1 year warranty
$449.00
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5. Panasonic Lumix G II Vario Lens, 100-300MM

If you’re disappointed by our last choice’s lack of autofocus, our last is sure to satisfy. The Panasonic Lumix G II 100-300mm Vario lens is an interesting lens to use with a Pocket camera. It’s great for action shots.

You’ll be happy to know that it quickly obtains and maintains focus on subjects regardless of their speed and distance from the camera.

Thanks to the 100-300mm focal length you’ll have great coverage and be able to capture the action from a great distance.

Since this lens was built for action, it’s accordingly weather-sealed, splash proof and can be relied upon in harsh weather.

All in all, the Panasonic Lumix G II 100-300mm is an excellent camera for shooting action from a distance.

The amazingly wide focal length guarantees amazing coverage and the autofocus impresses with its speed and reliability.

Panasonic LUMIX G II Vario Lens, 100-300MM, MIRRORLESS Micro Four Thirds, Power O.I.S, H-FSA100300 (USA Black)
  • Updated Panasonic LUMIX 100 300mm zoom lens replaces H FS100300
  • 100 300mm F4.0 5.6 (1 ED), closest Focusing Distance : 1.5m / 4.92feet
  • Upgraded support for harsh weather conditions (Splash proof / Dustproof)
  • Panasonic POWER O.I.S. compatible with LUMIX Dual I.S. 2.0 LUMIX Mirror less cameras.
  • Faster focus tracking via a 240 fps linear motor.Diagonal Angle of View:12°(Wide) 4.1°(Tele)
$647.99
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6. Olympus 12mm f/2

One of the fun things about owning a micro four-thirds camera is that you get to dabble in the world of pancake lenses.

Panasonic and Olympus offer plenty of great choices in this regard. The Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 is a great example of this. However, we went with the Olympus 12mm for 2 reasons.

First of all, the 12mm is an incredibly compact lens. It has a lovely and fast f/2 aperture.

You’ll get about 36mm focal length. Secondly, you can use this lens with other bodies like the Olympus OM-D or Panasonic’s GH4).

However, this lens offers the best performance when used with a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.

While you can use the basic AF system on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, you’ll mostly find yourself using manual focus to get it just right.

You can activate manual focus by sliding the focus ring on the lens.

Overall, the Olympus 12mm f/2 is one of the best lenses to get for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.

This is mainly thanks to its fast aperture, compact design, and manual focus activation feature.

Sale
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 Lens, for Micro Four Thirds Cameras (Black)
  • Ultra-wide angle fast aperture lens,Focal Length : 12 mm
  • Maximum f/2.0 aperture, great for low-light shooting, Minimum focusing distance : 7.9 inches
  • 24mm equivalent field of view great for street shots or landscapes
  • Premium metallic construction throughout, Snap focus ring with distance scale for manual focusing
  • Special all metal lens hood and cap optionally available
$799.00 −$120.00 $679.00
View on Amazon

Best Lens For BMPCC – Buying Considerations

Let’s take a look at the pointers you need to take into account when investing in a lens for the Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera.

Focal Length

How much coverage do you want your lens to do? Ask yourself this before you buy a lens. The focal length is measured in Millimeters.

The bigger the number the smaller the physical space a lens can cover.

Don’t be afraid to get lost in all the numbers, you can usually categorize the focal lengths in certain ranges.

Lenses that are 25mm or are somewhere in this ballpark have the widest coverage. You can capture scenery in full or a body within a physical space.

This is a good focal length for those shooting landscapes or architecture.

42.5mm or so is what we’d call medium range. For cinematographers, this is what they’d use for a medium shot or a medium close-up.

You can capture the head and shoulders of your subject. This is good for making a subject stand out in a frame.

Finally, we have a 60/70mm focal length. This is perfect for shooting close-ups. You can focus on the intimate details of your subject.

Things like facial features or the finer details of an inanimate object really stand out in this focal length.

Aperture

Aperture tells you how fast a lens is. It also lets you know the amount of light allowed into the lens. Aperture is measured in f-numbers like f/3.5 or f/4.

The larger numbers indicate a slower aperture. The smaller the number, the more light a lens can take in and the better it performs in low-light situations.

So yes, the bigger the F-number the slower the camera will be.

Usually, lens kits will have apertures around f5.6. This is simply too slow and will make your shooting experience less than optimal.

You’ll notice that most of our lenses range at 1.8, this offers the fastest and best performance especially, in low-light conditions.

Versatility

Lenses can be costly so it seems like a sound idea to get all-purpose lenses that can cover a wide range of focal lengths.

Something like 24-70mm zoom can do a lot at once. It can shoot close-ups and all the way up to wide-angles.

This is a good beginner’s lens. However, one thing you’ll notice as you use these lenses is the hit in quality they take.

Because these lenses have to cover such a wide focal range, they can’t really perform exceptionally well in all of them because they’re not optimized to a fixed or minimal range.

In other words, they are jacks of all trades, masters of none.

Therefore, once you figure out what type of videography you’d like to do or even when you use multiple angles for your shots, it’s better to pick specialized lenses with smaller or fixed ranges.

These offer a much sharper image quality because they have fewer fish to fry.

Best Lens For Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera – Wrapping up

This concludes our guide on the best lens for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.

Hopefully, now you have a better idea of what lenses to get and what is the best lens for BMPCC.

Remember that picking lenses is less about how much they cost and more about what they do.

And, also, remember to consider the kind of project and use case you might have for a particular lens.

First, make sure that they are compatible with your Blackmagic Pocket camera. Read the type of mount and make sure it goes with your camera.

Second, ensure that you’re getting the focal range that best suits your shooting style.

Finally, make sure that the aperture has a smaller number so that you know that the lens is fast.

So, what are you waiting for? Get yourself a lens to mount on your Blackmagic Pocket camera and start experimenting and getting the most out of that wonderful body!

We hope this article has informed your buying decision when it comes to the best lens for BMPCC.

Did this guide covering everything you needed to know about lenses on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera? Let us know in the comments just below here!

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