Earlier this week Coding Dojo had a very informative lecture on Internet 101/How to Scale and Build Web Applications by our friend Nick Avgerinos from Hackbright Academy!

Nick, an instructor, chose to cover a more basic and yet important topic for this lecture because to his surprise, he noticed that new developers don’t really know how the Web works. Because these developers are doing so many cool things on the web, it is crucial for them to know what happens from when you enter a web address to when you have your destination page loaded. He lectured about how the Internet works in a broad overview, covering DNS, Gateway, ISP, Server, and more.

Nick tends to be more of a generalist versus a specialist and is very interested in knowing about how things work. He highly recommended everyone to always ask WHY when it comes to technology in order to figure out how different aspects of the technology work.

Both of our classes took away some great key points about the basic flow of the Internet and inspiration from Nick’s professional background. Nick’s professional background includes him being the Director of Engineering at KIXEYE, Senior Systems Engineer at Adobe Systems, Director of Software Engineering at Sputnik, Inc. and Director of Software Engineering at VoiIP, Inc.!

One of the most interesting topics that Nick covered was more personal than instructional. He spoke to the class about his switch from being a director at tech companies to an educational company that focuses on teaching programming. He explained that as a past hiring manager, he was uncertain about the credibility of programming bootcamps and if the graduates truly knew how to code. After watching someone close to him not only excel, graduate, but land a job after being enrolled in a programming bootcamp, his curiosity peaked. He checked out the program and decided to teach at Hackbright Academy to feed his curiosity and to his astonishment, he realized the true potential of programming bootcamps.

He believes that being in a programming bootcamp is similar to having a full-time developer position. The students are at the camp for 40 hours a week (if not more!), coding. They learn an INCREDIBLE amount, way more programming than one learns while enrolled in a 4 year Computer Science program at a university (and he said this from personal experience!). We absolutely agree!

Nick, thank you so much for taking the time out of your day to come speak about your career path and lecture us on cool tech!