Texas Mayor Calls for End to 'Catch and Release' As Migrant Surge Strains Law Enforcement

a group of people walking down a dirt road: The mayor of Eagle Pass, Texas, said his city needs more law enforcement officials to assist with the current surge of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. In the photo above, asylum seekers walk toward a U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico on March 23, 2021 near Mission, Texas. © John Moore/Getty Images The mayor of Eagle Pass, Texas, said his city needs more law enforcement officials to assist with the current surge of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. In the photo above, asylum seekers walk toward a U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico on March 23, 2021 near Mission, Texas.

In Eagle Pass, Texas, the migrants Border Patrol agents release into the community have little impact on the city's residents due to the speed with which they move on to their next destinations, according to the city's mayor.

Mission: Border Hope, a local nonprofit, assists Eagle Pass by coordinating transportation for the migrants, whom Mayor Luis Sifuentes said are arriving by the hundreds.

"They're being released in our community to an NGO, which is Mission: Border Hope, and they're really quick about getting them transported, finding them transportation outside of Eagle Pass," Sifuentes told Newsweek. "It's rare that we have any of those individuals that are released stay 24 hours."

The real problem for Eagle Pass, which is located right along the Rio Grande with a population the U.S. Census Bureau estimates to be around 30,000, is that migrants are still crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally and passing through the city on their journey. Those illegal crossings are putting a strain on Border Patrol agents and local law enforcement, Sifuentes said.

Texas Mayor Calls for End to 'Catch and Release' As Migrant Surge Strains Law Enforcement