Businesses anger grows at Biden's infrastructure plan

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Major American business groups have lined up against President Joe Biden's $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan – even after many of them got behind his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief effort.

The opposition signals the headwinds the White House is up against promoting a package the Biden is designating as the next big push of his agenda, and one that he said Friday would create 19 million jobs.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce went after the plan as 'dangerously misguided.' 

'Properly done, a major investment in infrastructure today is an investment in the future, and like a new home, should be paid for over time — say 30 years — by the users who benefit from the investment,' the group said in a statement.

a car parked in a parking lot: Business groups are lining up against tax increases in President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan – although Biden says it will create 19 million jobs © Provided by Daily Mail Business groups are lining up against tax increases in President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan – although Biden says it will create 19 million jobs

 'We strongly oppose the general tax increases proposed by the administration which will slow the economic recovery and make the U.S. less competitive globally — the exact opposite of the goals of the infrastructure plan.'

Notably, the group supported Biden's first major achievement, the coronavirus law.  

'We support the new administration’s focus on removing roadblocks to vaccinations and reopening schools, both of which are important steps to accelerating a broad-based economic recovery for all Americans,' said the group's head, Neil Bradley, a former House Republican leadership staffer.  

The Business Roundtable, another powerful business group, blasted tax increases it said would create 'new barriers to job creation and economic growth,' while the National Association of Manufacturers said it would 'turn back the clock to the archaic tax policies' – a possible reference to Biden's call to boost corporate tax rates up to 28 per cent from 21 percent. The 2017 tax law signed by President Trump brought them down from 35 per cent.  

a large bridge over a body of water: Biden's plan contains funds for roads and bridges, but Republicans have been aiming fire at job training and other programs

Businesses anger grows at Biden's infrastructure plan