Bosque

According to Microsoft’s Mark Marron, it’s time to move beyond the structured programming paradigm of the 1970s and onto something a whole lot simpler. With Bosque, Microsoft’s new open source programming language, he’s attempting to do just that.

Marron sees Bosque as an entirely new model, which he dubs “regularized programming,” because it does away with techniques that accidently create complexity – like loops, conditionals, and subroutines – and focuses instead on algebraic operations.

"This model builds on the successes of structured programming and abstract data types by simplifying existing programming models into a regularized form that eliminates major sources of errors, simplifies code understanding and modification, and converts many automated reasoning tasks over code into trivial propositions," he explains in his technical paper.

“The result,” according to the project’s GitHub page, “is improved developer productivity, increased software quality, and [the enabling of] a range of new compilers and developer tooling experiences.”

“Bosque [currently] relies on an interpreter written in TypeScript, run on Node.js, as a reference implementation,” The Register’s Thomas Claburn points out. [But] looking ahead, Marron intends to implement ahead-of-time compilation for WASM and native code.” He’s also “going to focus on filling out the various TODO items, bug fixes, and developing features that will support writing larger programs in the language.”

Marron hopes his creation will soon find its place outside academia, perhaps in the cloud or in IoT applications, since it "can be compiled into a small footprint, can start quickly, and can be verified for correctness through symbolic analysis.”

For more information along with code examples, check out the Bosque GitHub page.