Whiffing and Kissing

Okay, so here's a post I wrote and thought I'd posted, back on Tuesday. But I went to start the new post today, and found this one still sitting in draft. So here's last week's post, and a new one will come through early next week. 


Today's offering is "My Kiss is a Gift" by Gene Marshall. I find this record - or, more specifically, this lyric - downright peculiar. There isn't much to it, as you'll find after a quick listen. The track is fleshed out by repeating the two line chorus over and over again, and the verse lyrics are variations of the same ten words or so, rearranged a bit, each time. This alone is not all that unusual among song-poems, although it's interesting that Gene never actually sings the title of the song - the word "gift" isn't even in the lyric.

But it's that chorus that befuddles me: "To send you just a whiff, a kiss; to send you just a dearly kiss". What the HELL does that mean. Is there anyone out there that has, in describing a kiss, used the word "whiff". I actually find that distinctly unpleasant. And what is a "dearly kiss". If you have any great thoughts therein, by all means let me know.

Download: Gene Marshall - My Kiss is a Gift
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Actually, I was intrigued by this record, before hearing it, by the title of the flip side, "Possessed". And it's not bad - there's some good lyrics here, and Gene endows it with some really good emotion. The band arrangement has, to my ears, a touch of the Rodd Keith sound. If I hadn't heard 50 other midtempo Gene Marshall Preview sides that sounded pretty much just like this, I might find this more compelling. As it is, it's certainly decent enough, but doesn't really stand out.

Download: Gene Marshall - Possessed
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Source: bobpurse

Whiffing and Kissing