Clash of Clans owner faces class action over falsely marketed ‘free’ games

Teenager playing a game on his smartphone.
(Photo Credit: Josue Ladoo Pelegrin/Pexels.com)

Class of Clans Class Action Lawsuit Overview:

  • Who: A minor plaintiff has filed a class action lawsuit against Supercell Inc., the seller of “free” video games Clash of Clans, Clash Royale, and Brawl Stars.
  • Why: Supercell allegedly falsely markets the games as “free” but reaps billions of dollars in purchases by enticing children to purchase in-game currency.
  • Where: The Clash of Clans class action lawsuit was filed in California federal court.

The seller of popular “free” video games Clash of Clans, Clash Royale, and Brawl Stars is facing a class action lawsuit over the sale of in-game currency to minors.

The lawsuit alleges the seller, Supercell Inc., markets these video games as free to play but reaps billions of dollars in revenue from the games through the sale of in-game currency. Much of this income is from children who play these games, according to the Clash of Clans class action lawsuit.

Although the games can be played without making in-game purchases, many of their most desirable in-game avatars and other items can only be purchased with virtual currency called “gems.” 

Some gems can be earned through gameplay, but most gems reportedly require users to buy them with real money.

“This system was created to capitalize on and encourage addictive behaviors,” the Clash of Clans class action lawsuit states. “Minors are especially susceptible to these addiction-forming elements of game design.”

“The experience of acquiring in-game items holds a strong appeal for minors and reinforces their desire to keep playing and continue making purchases.”

Supercell reportedly earned more than $2 billion in 2021. The Clash Royale class action lawsuit claims that Supercell pursues these enormous profits at the expense of minors and fails to provide an unrestricted right to seek refunds of in-game purchases made by minors as required by California law.

Clash of Clans class action says California law allows minors to disaffirm contracts and have a right to a refund

In California, the law allows minors to disaffirm contracts without restriction.

Supercell reportedly requires its terms of service to be accepted by legal adults, but continues to target minors, the Brawl Stars class action lawsuit alleges. Supercell allegedly allows players whose ages have not been verified, or whose ages have been verified as being under the age of 18, to make in-game purchases.

Plaintiff T.T., a minor from California, reportedly had his own Clash Royale account and made multiple in-game purchases using his own money. He subsequently regretted making the purchases and wanted to request a refund.

However, T.T. was not able to pursue a refund because Supercell’s policy is that all purchases are non-refundable.

He seeks to represent a Class of minors who made a purchase of virtual currency or an in-game benefit or exchanged in-game currency for an in-game benefit within Clash of Clans, Clash Royale, and/or Brawl Stars.

Activision Blizzard is facing a similar class action lawsuit for allegedly refusing refunds to minors who make in-game purchases.

Do you think Supercell should issue refunds to minors who purchased in-game currency through Clash of Clans, Clash Royale, and Brawl Stars? Join the discussion in the comments!

The plaintiff is represented by L. Timothy Fisher, Philip L. Fraietta, Alec M. Leslie, Matthew A. Girardi, and Julian C. Diamond of Bursor & Fisher PA.

The Clash of Clans Class Action Lawsuit is T.T. v. Supercell Inc., Case No. 3:22-cv-03196-LB, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.


Don’t Miss Out!

Check out our list of Class Action Lawsuits and Class Action Settlements you may qualify to join!


Read About More Class Action Lawsuits & Class Action Settlements:

We tell you about cash you can claim EVERY WEEK! Sign up for our free newsletter.

The post Clash of Clans owner faces class action over falsely marketed ‘free’ games appeared first on Top Class Actions.

Clash of Clans owner faces class action over falsely marketed ‘free’ games