More Love (And Higher Bids) For Blue Note 4200 Records

I was watching the latest auction from the Jazz Record Center, so let’s get into another Blue Note day, starting with Sam Rivers, Contours, Blue Note 4206. This was an original New York USA pressing with the Van Gelder stamp and “Audition Copy” stamped on the back. The record looked to be in M- condition and the cover was probably VG++. The final price was $754. From what I can see on Popsike, this is the second highest price for this record, or any Sam Rivers record. Several years ago, a copy of Contours sold for $810.

From the same auction: Grant Green, Street of Dreams, Blue Note 4253. This was an original mono pressing with the Van Gelder stamp. The record looked to be in M- condition and the cover, based on the pictures, looked to be VG+ to me, although the listing makes it sound more like VG++. I guess the buyer made his own judgment, and judged $935 to be the going rate for this copy.

One of the interesting phenomena of the new market is the rise in bidding for these later Blue Notes of the 4200 era. Here’s another: Jackie McLean, Action, Blue Note 4218. This one looked to be in M- condition for the record and M- for the cover as well. The final price was $1,180. And one more: Lee Morgan, Delightfulee, Blue Note 4243. This was an original mono pressing. The record looked to be M- and the cover probably around VG++. The final price was $404.

This continued rise in value for these records provides a segue to a note I received the other day from Dale, under the subject: Jazz Value Question. Here ’tis:

“Here is something I’ve been thinking about. I’m guessing that most Jazz collectors who have valuable collections are probably pushing 60 years old or older. Of course, there are many exceptions.

1. 20 years or so from now, will the bottom fall out on many of the valuable Jazz records due to lack of demand? (baby boomers will be dying off, many selling collections or estates selling).

2. If one is in that age bracket and has valuable collections (assuming the value is important), what would be the market signs that will show it’s time to unload.

I think this would make a great discussion. Personally, I think we are at the peak right now for Jazz values in general. Plus, all the labels are releasing all these re-issues while the going is good.

Of course, there are many young Jazz collectors, but enough to keep the present values? Maybe on a first pressing Blue Train. Beatles, Zeppelin, etc will have many years ahead….those bands are still played on regular rock radio today.

I would love to see a good discussion on this topic somewhere.”

I wrote back to Dale, noting that we have been having this discussion for years here at Jazz Collector. But I also said it’s always of prime interest to the community and, when we experience major changes in the market, as we’re seeing with the records listed in this post, it is always interesting to recalibrate our opinions. I know I have done so over the past two years in watching the market change during Covid and seeing a new coterie of younger collectors, who apparently have money.

 

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More Love (And Higher Bids) For Blue Note 4200 Records