What is NTB/CBNA on My Credit Report?

If you have a new entry from NTB/CBNA on your credit report, it’s important to understand how it got there.

Representing National Tire & Battery and Citibank, the entry is probably a hard inquiry.

An inquiry from NTB/CBNA is typically the result of a credit card application.

In the article below, we’ll break down the details of the NTB/CBNA credit card, how a hard inquiry works, and what you can do to get an inaccurate inquiry off your report.

NTB/CBNA On My Credit Report

Citibank is a major financial institution that offers credit cards in partnership with numerous retailers, including:

  • Best Buy
  • Brooks Brothers
  • The Home Depot
  • National Tire and Battery
  • And more

The National Tire and Battery card offers a sign-on reward and interest-free payments on purchases of $699 or more when you pay it off in a year.

Applying for a credit card on the Citibank website may only take a few moments, but it can have a more lasting effect on your credit.

When you apply for a credit card or consent to being an authorized user on another individual’s account, you can expect a hard inquiry to follow.

If you are overwhelmed by dealing with negative entries on your credit report,
we suggest you ask a professional credit repair company for help.

Ask Lex Law for Help

How Will an NTB/CBNA Hard Inquiry Affect Your Credit?

Whether or not an inquiry impacts your credit depends on if it is a soft or hard credit check.

SOFT CREDIT CHECK

A soft inquiry doesn’t impact your score, nor is it added to your credit report.

Soft inquiries happen when you pre-qualify for a credit card or loan, compare quotes, check your score, or get vetted for a job or apartment application.

HARD CREDIT CHECK

While they don’t do much damage, hard inquiries are added to your report.

A hard inquiry can be prompted by an application for a credit card or loan, or in some cases a rental application.

If you applied for a Citibank credit card, the bank might have accessed one or more of your credit reports, meaning each of your reports could feature a hard inquiry.

Hard credit pulls let creditors see your credit reports, giving them an idea of how responsibly you use credit.

Fortunately, these inquiries only stay on your report for a couple of years, and they typically only drop your score by a point or two.

Since they’re required for getting new credit, it’s okay to have an inquiry on your report.

That being said, lenders might be discouraged from approving your application if your credit report is riddled with hard inquiries.

Try to limit your credit applications to offers you’re likely to get approved for by checking into their criteria before applying.

If you’re mortgage shopping or comparing quotes for a particular type of loan or card, complete all your applications within 14 days of one another.

That way your report won’t be hit with each individual application.

How to Get NTB/CBNA Deleted from Your Credit Report

If you applied for credit from National Tire and Battery, you probably won’t be able to get it off your report.

But if you don’t recognize the name and never consented to a credit check from Citibank, you shouldn’t ignore the inquiry.

It could be there as the result of a simple reporting error at the hands of the bank or credit bureaus.

Or, it could be there because someone is using your identity fraudulently.

Either way, read on to learn how to get a hard inquiry taken off your credit report.

File a Dispute with CitiBank and the Credit Bureaus

Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, you can get fraudulent inquiries removed from your report.

All you have to do is file a dispute with the credit bureaus who are featuring the inquiry in question.

Then, they’ll open an investigation. Within 30 days, the inaccurate entry should be deleted from your report.

You can mail in a dispute or file one online, uploading documentation to support your case.

To help your dispute run smoothly, you may also want to contact Citibank. They can give you pertinent details, like the account number and information about the credit card application that led to the inquiry.

Along with filing a dispute, you can also:

  1. Freeze your credit report
  2. Add a fraud alert
  3. Report suspected identity fraud at identitytheft.gov

Keep an Eye on Your Credit

Each year, you can obtain a copy of your credit report at annualcreditreport.com for free.

But there is a way to check your credit score more frequently. If you aren’t already, you should sign up for free credit monitoring.

A credit monitoring platform can give you routine score updates and notify you whenever there is a change to your report.

Whenever a new inquiry pops up, you’ll be informed of it quickly.

Apps like Credit Karma also help you to improve your credit with an analysis of your credit profile and recommended credit card and loan offers to give you a boost.

Get a Free Copy of Your Credit Report>>

Get Help from a Credit Repair Company

Need help getting NTB/CBNA off your report? You may want to work with a credit repair company.

There are several excellent credit repair companies that are experts at disputing inaccuracies and improving consumers’ credit scores.

In addition to disputing hard inquiries, they can also assist you with:

  • Bankruptcy
  • Charge-offs
  • Debt collectors
  • Foreclosure
  • Judgments
  • Liens
  • Poor payment history
  • Repossession

Credit repair specialists can help you get to the bottom of your credit problems so you can improve your score quickly.

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Bottom Line

If there’s a questionable inquiry from NTB/CBNA on your credit report, you shouldn’t have any trouble getting it removed.

All you need to do is dispute the entry.

While you won’t be able to get a legitimate inquiry off your report after applying for a card, it’s nothing to worry about.

Two years from now, the inquiry will fall off your report naturally, and it’ll only do minimal damage in the meantime.

If you need help building your credit, consider reaching out to a credit repair company for a consultation today.

The post What is NTB/CBNA on My Credit Report? appeared first on Better Credit Blog | Credit Help For Bad Credit.

What is NTB/CBNA on My Credit Report?