Duck Fart, Buttery Nipple, and other “yummy cocktails with nasty-sounding names.” (Dictionary.com)

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk made an April Fools’ joke about “Teslaquila.” Now the company has filed an intent-to-use trademark application for Tesla-branded tequila. (Bloomberg)

Teslaquila

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Video explainer: How the Beatles got their logo. (Brand New)

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I’m quoted in this article by Corinne Purtill on the difference between asshat and assclown. (Quartz)

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And here’s more about asshat. (Merriam-Webster)

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Honest dating profiles of punctuation marks. (Apostrophe: “I’ve been accused of being too possessive.”) (New Yorker)

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The Oxford English Dictionary has added 100 film terms, including “mumblecore” (noted in a 2007 Fritinancy post) and “Lynchian.” (Mental Floss)

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The OED has also added “a metric buttload” of posterior-related words, including bum bag, buttmunch, and, of course, assclown. (Ben Zimmer for Strong Language)

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Meanwhile, the latest edition of the official Scrabble dictionary, published by Merriam-Webster, includes 300 new words, the most satisfying of which is probably OK. (Smithsonian Magazine)

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Hot & Hot, Bagel & Bagel, and other “X & X” brand names in China. (Language Log) Related: My Pinterest board of “X & Y” brand names in the U.S.

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Shades of meaning: What’s the difference between an expat and an immigrant? (The Atlantic)

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Baby name trend: Americans are naming boys Power, Chaos, and Rage; they’re naming girls Happiness, Lace, and Gorgeous.(Baby Name Wizard)

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An interesting roundup of exvertisements, ““the type of advertising that draws viewers’ attention away from the client’s product or service.” (Campaign Outsider)

philip morris exvertisement

Exvertisement from Phillip Morris

 

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Word watch #2: Did you know that Voldemort has been verbed? Australian researcher Emily van der Nagel – who has a PhD in social media pseudonymity – defines it as “hiding a word in plain sight,” as “Voldemort” was replaced with euphemisms in the Harry Potter books. In online usage, it shows up as “Cheeto” (for Donald Trump), “birdsite” (for Twitter), and other replacements that indicate the user “isn’t happy about either entity.” (Gretchen McCulloch, resident linguist at Wired)