The charred timber skin of this sustainable cabin blends it with the craggy 300-year-old lava field surrounding Lake Mývatn in northern Iceland – the first of a new campsite in the scenic area.

Danish-Icelandic practice Studio Heima designed the 21 sq m tiny home, dubbed Aska (or Ash, in English), borrowing from Japanese and Nordic design elements. Light pine plywood lines the cabin’s interiors to contrast the burnt pine cladding, charred using the Japanese technique shou sugi ban to protect it from the harsh elements and add to its longevity.

Photography: Auðunn Nielsson

The interior is maximised via tall ceilings and bespoke furniture, including a double bedroom, bath and open plan kitchen with large picture windows looking on the Hverfjall Volcano and Lake Mývatn. Meanwhile, the roof is planted with indigenous vegetations to insulate the hut.

Further structures will be built at the campsite in future months. In the meantime, the cabin is accessible year-round and is available to book from £90 per night via Airbnb.

Photography: Auðunn Nielsson
Photography: Auðunn Nielsson
Photography: Auðunn Nielsson
Photography: Trym Sannes

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