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Setting up an ES6 Project Using Babel and webpack

In this article, we’re going to look at creating a build setup for handling modern JavaScript (running in web browsers) using Babel and Webpack. This is needed to ensure that our modern JavaScript code in particular is made compatible with a wider range of browsers than it might otherwise be. JavaScript, like most web-related technologies, is evolving all the time. In the good old days, we could drop a couple of <script> tags into...

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Introduction to the Fetch API

In this article, we’ll learn what the new Fetch API looks like, what problems it solves, and the most practical way to retrieve remote data inside your web page using the fetch() function. For years, XMLHttpRequest has been web developers’ trusted sidekick. Whether directly or under the hood, XMLHttpRequest has enabled Ajax and a whole new type of interactive experience, from Gmail to Facebook. However, XMLHttpRequest is slowly...

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ES6 Generators and Iterators: a Developer’s Guide

ES6 brought a number of new features to the JavaScript language. Two of these features, generators and iterators, have substantially changed how we write specific functions in more complex front-end code. While they do play nicely with each other, what they actually do can be a little confusing, so let’s check them out. Iterators Iteration is a common practice in programming and is usually used to loop over a set of values, either...

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Building a Twitter Client with NodeJS and Angular

In this tutorial, we’re going to look at how to build a basic Twitter client with NodeJS, and an Angular application to display your home timeline of tweets. This is a rapid tour with things to consider while setting up your own Twitter client and Angular application. First, we’re going to build a NodeJS server, which will handle communicating between the Twitter API and the Angular application. Then, we’ll build up the Angular...

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A Beginner Splurge in Node.js

It's 3 a.m., hands over the keyboard while staring at an empty console. The bright prompt over a dark backdrop ready, yearning to take in commands. Want to hack up Node.js for a little while? One of the exciting news about Node.js is that it runs anywhere. This opens up the stack to various ways to experiment with it. For any seasoned veteran, this is a fun run of the command line tooling. What I like the most is that we can survey the...

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Building a React Universal Blog App: Implementing Flux

In the first part of this miniseries, we started digging into the world of React to see how we could use it, together with Node.js, to build a React Universal Blog App. In this second and last part, we'll take our blog to the next level by learning how to add and edit content. We'll also get into the real meat of how to easily scale our React Universal Blog App using React organizational concepts and the Flux pattern. Break It Down for...

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Using Inline Partials and Decorators with Handlebars 4.0

Handlebars is one of the most widely used JavaScript templating libraries for both client-side and server-side rendering. It implements the mustache specification but adds some extra sauce to make working with templates easier. If you're new to Handlebars and want to know more, I suggest you to check out my Pluralsight course on JavaScript Templating with Handlebars to learn how to get started. Handlebars version 4.0 landed in...

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Using Inline Partials and Decorators with Handlebars 4.0

Handlebars is one of the most widely used JavaScript templating libraries for both client-side and server-side rendering. It implements the mustache specification but adds some extra sauce to make working with templates easier. If you’re new to Handlebars and want to know more, I suggest you to check out my Pluralsight course on JavaScript Templating with Handlebars to learn how to get started. Handlebars version 4.0 landed in...

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GraphQL Overview: Build a to-Do List API with a React Front-End

Imagine you want to bake a cake by following a recipe. You'll need a few ingredients, and a right quantity for each of them. What if you could get a box with all the ingredients your recipe requires, already measured and weighted to match your recipe? It surely would make baking much easier. This is what GraphQL is meant to do, if you imagine the front-end UI as a cake. In this tutorial we'll write a small GraphQL server to respond to...