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Technology Short Take 160

Welcome to Technology Short Take #160! This time around, my list of links and articles is a tad skewed toward cloud computing/cloud management, but I’ve still managed to pull together some links on other topics that readers will hopefully find useful. For example, did you know about the secret macOS network quality tool? You didn’t? Lucky for you there’s a link to an article about it below. Read on to get all the...

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Referencing Configuration Values in Pulumi YAML

Lately I’ve been doing a fair amount of work with Pulumi’s YAML support (see this blog post announcing it), and I recently ran into a situation where I wanted to read in and use a configuration value (set via pulumi config). When using one of Pulumi’s supported programming languages, like TypeScript or Python or Go, this is pretty easy. It’s also easy in YAML, but not as intuitive as I originally expected. In this post, I’ll...

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Managing AWS Key Pairs with Pulumi and Go

As I was winding down things at Kong and getting ready to transition to Pulumi (more information on why I moved to Pulumi here), I casually made the comment on Twitter that I needed to start managing my AWS key pairs using Pulumi. When the opportunity arose last week, I started doing exactly that! In this post, I’ll show you a quick example of how to use Pulumi and Go to declaratively manage AWS key pairs. This is a pretty simple...

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Site Category Changes

This weekend I made a couple of small changes to the categories on the site, in an effort to make navigation a bit more intuitive. In the past, readers had expressed some confusion over the “Education” and “Explanation” categories, and—to be frank—their confusion was warranted. I also wasn’t clear on the distinction between those categories, so this post explains the changes I’ve made. The following category changes are...

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Technology Short Take 157

Welcome to Technology Short Take 157! I hope that this collection of links I’ve gathered is useful to someone out there. In particular, the “Career/Soft Skills” section is a bit bigger than usual this time around, as is the “Security” section. Networking Interested in understanding how NAT Traversal works? David Anderson’s post on how NAT Traversal works should help. This happened a couple of months ago, but I don’t...

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Technology Short Take 156

Welcome to Technology Short Take #156! It’s been about a month since the last Technology Short Take, and in that time I’ve been gathering links that I wanted to share with my readers. (I still have quite the backlog of links to read!) Hopefully something I share here will prove useful to someone. Enjoy the links below, and enjoy your weekend! Networking I’d never heard of Pipy before seeing it in this article, but it look like...

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Making Flatpak Firefox use Private Browsing by Default

In April 2021 I wrote a post on making Firefox use Private Browsing by default, in which I showed how to modify the GNOME desktop file so that Firefox would open private windows by default without restricting access to normal browsing windows and functionality. I’ve used that technique on all my Fedora-based systems since that time, until just recently. What happened recently, you ask? I switched to the Flatpak version of Firefox....

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Git Difftool and Meld as a Flatpak

I’ve recently started migrating many of the applications on my Fedora 36 laptop to their Flatpak versions. For the most part, this has been pretty straightforward, although there isn’t really any method for migrating configuration and data. Today I ran into a problem with Meld, a graphical diff utility, and using it with the git difftool command. Below I’ll share how I worked around this problem. Normally, the integration between...

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Fine-Tuning Control Plane Access with Cluster API

When Cluster API creates a workload cluster, it also creates a load balancing solution to handle traffic to the workload cluster’s control plane. This is necessary so that the control plane endpoint is decoupled from the underlying control plane nodes (which facilitates scaling the control plane, among other things). On AWS, this mean creating an ELB and a set of security groups. For flexibility, Cluster API provides a limited...