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Power Begets Power

In life, the rich get richer, the successful get more successful, and the powerful get more powerful.Separate from the debate of whether this is a good thing or not, most agree there is a tendency for these things to happen.The question is, “Why?”And, why does it matter to you?When you’re rich, you’re able to use your capital to gain access to information, opportunities, and relationships that others don’t have...

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Meghan Markle Oprah Interview

A part of me can’t believe that I’m actually going to write about the Meghan Markle interview with Oprah. I pretty much ignore American and British tabloid media. I don’t pay attention to anything going on with the British royal family (and former members thereof). However, for some reason I can’t quite articulate, I decided to watch the full interview. Invariably, interviews like this end up becoming a battle of narratives....

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Thoughts on Power

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the idea of power. For the entirety of my career, I’ve operated in the world of power. At first, it was the world of Fortune 500 boardrooms. I was in my first boardroom at age 22. Up until that point, I had never seen a conference room table that seated 65 people, where each person had a microphone (because otherwise, you couldn’t hear a board member at the other end of the table). Later, it...

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Emotional Resilience in a Pandemic

Adversity comes in two flavors. The first is a hardship due to an external factor often outside of your control. This is a crisis that occurs due to circumstances or something external that impacts you. COVID-19 and the related economic contraction is a good example of externally driven adversity. The second type is an internal crisis. This can be a crisis of confidence, self-worth, or identity. Internal crises are often (but not...

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First-Order Principles

Over the arc of my career, I’ve done extensive work in professional development. This work included learning an endless list of strategies, tactics, and skills. When I look back over that time, the parts that I have valued the most are things I call “first-order principles.” A principle is a rule of thumb that’s timeless in nature. For example, I took a public speaking class at Stanford when I was 19 years old. The single most...