csstricks

Web Languages as Compile Targets

Jim Nielsen quoting Eric Bailey: He references an example on Twitter where someone noted you can use the <details> element to “create a native HTML accordion,” to which someone responded: “this works without Bootstrap? 🤯” What’s the problem here? From Eric: the problem that arises from this situation is that it teaches people to think and work framework-first. When that happens, the hard-won, baked-in interoperability...

csstricks

Jenny B Kowalski’s A-Z (and a-z) as Variable Letterforms

Jenny B Kowalski has been posting a-letter-a-day on Instagram exploring multi-axis variable/responsive letterforms. They are very clever in that one of the axes controls an uppercase-to-lowercase conversion, literally morphing the shape of the letters from an uppercase version to a lowercase version. The other axis is a stroke weight, which also dramatically changes the feel of the letters. Here’s Q, one of my favorites: ...

csstricks

List Markers and String Styles

Lists—we’ve all worked with them in one form or another. I’m talking about HTML’s <ol> and <ul>. Much of the time, because we desire styling control, we turn off the list’s markers completely with list-style-type: none, and start styling from there. Other times, we choose from a very limited set of unordered list markers, such as disc, circle, or square; or a (much) wider range of ordered list markers. We might even,...

csstricks

The Almost-Complete Guide to Cumulative Layout Shift

Here’s Jess B. Peck writing all about Google’s Core Web Vitals: Let’s step back one. CLS is when you’re about to click on a link, and the whole page shifts and you click on a different link instead. It’s when you’re halfway through a blogpost and an ad loads and you lose your place. It is when… the layout shifts. At least, that’s what it’s trying to measure– both those shifts, how often they happen, and...