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Lessons Learned from a Little Bug

Almost 10 years ago, I wrote a series of blog posts on project estimation and black swans. And, almost 10 years after that, Chris NeJame reported an observation about the following passage towards the end of Part 4 of the series: As Jerry (Weinberg) has frequently pointed out, plenty of organizations fall victim to back luck, but much of the time, it’s not the bad luck that does them in; it’s how they react to the bad luck. Did you...

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Testing Doesn’t Add Value to the Product

Testers consistently ask how to show (or demonstrate, or prove, or calculate) that testing adds value. Programmers, designers, and other builders create and add value by creating and building and improving the product. Testing does not add value to the product. And that’s fine. Managers assure quality by helping programmers, designers, and others to obtain the resources they need, and by removing (or at least reducing) obstacles to...

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Expected Results

Klára Jánová is a dedicated tester who studies and practices and advocates Rapid Software Testing. Recently, on LinkedIn, she said: I might EXPECT something to happen. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that I WANT IT/DESIRE for IT to happen. I even may want it to happen, but it not happening doesn’t have to automatically mean that there’s a problem. The point of this post: no more “expected results” in the bug reports,...

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“Why Didn’t We Catch This in QA?”

My good friend Keith Klain recently posted this on LinkedIn: “Why didn’t we catch this in QA” might possibly be the most psychologically terrorizing and dysfunctional software testing culture an organization can have. I’ve seen it literally destroy good people and careers. It flies in the face of systems thinking, complexity of failure, risk management, and just about everything we know about the psychology involved in testing,...

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Breaking the Test Case Addiction (Part 12)

In previous posts in this series, I made a claim about the audience for a test report: They almost certainly don’t want to know about when the testing is going to be done (although they might think they do). It’s true that managers frequently ask testers when the testing will be done. That’s a hard question to answer, but maybe not for reasons that you—or they—might have considered. By definition, testers who are working for...

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Breaking the Test Case Addiction (Part 11)

In the previous post in this series, I made these claims about the audience for test reports: They almost certainly don’t want to know about test case counts (although they might think they do). They almost certainly don’t want to know about pass-fail ratios (although they might think they do). They almost certainly don’t want to know about when the testing is going to be done (although they might think they do). It’s far...

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Breaking the Test Case Addiction (Part 2)

Last time out, I was responding to a coaching client, a tester who was working in an organization fixated on test cases. Here, I’ll call her Frieda. She had some more questions about how to respond to her managers. What if they want another tester to do your tests if you are not available? “‘Your tests’, or ‘your testing’?”, I asked. From what I’ve heard, your tests. I don’t agree with this but trying to see it from...