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Watch Elon Musk’s Neuralink brain control interface startup presentation live

One of Elon Musk’s stealthier endeavors is set to become a lot less stealthy tonight, with a presentation set for 8 PM PT (11 PM ET) streaming live directly via the embedded YouTube video above, in which we’ll learn a lot more about Neuralink, the company Musk founded in 2017 to work on brain control interfaces (BCIs) and essentially part of his larger strategy to help mitigate the risks of AI and enhance its potential benefits. Here’s what we do know about Neuralink already: Its initial goal, at least as of two years ago, was to...

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Elon Musk-backed Neuralink to detail its progress on upgrading the brain to keep pace with AI

Elon Musk’s brain computer interface (BCI) venture Neuralink will provide some more insight into what they’ve been working on for the past two years, during which time we’ve heard very little in the way of updates on their progress. In 2017, we learned that Neuralink’s overall driving mission was to help humans keep pace with rapid advancements in AI, ensuring that we can continue to work with ever-more advanced technology by closing the input and output gap between ourselves and computers. Musk has famously forewarned of the potential...

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Elon Musk wasn’t wrong about automating the Model 3 assembly line — he was just ahead of his time

Ryan Kottenstette Contributor Ryan Kottenstette is CEO and co-founder at Cape Analytics. More posts by this contributor Silicon Valley companies are undermining the impact of artificial intelligence In 2017, when Tesla announced incredibly ambitious Model 3 production targets of 5,000 Model 3s per week and the beginning of “production hell,” analysts were wary. But Elon Musk insisted he could pull it off, citing hyper-automation — a robotic assembly line — as his secret weapon to increase manufacturing speed and drive...

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OpenAI built a text generator so good, it’s considered too dangerous to release

A storm is brewing over a new language model, built by non-profit artificial intelligence research company OpenAI, which it says is so good at generating convincing, well-written text that it’s worried about potential abuse. That’s angered some in the community, who have accused the company of reneging on a promise not to close off its research. OpenAI said its new natural language model, GPT-2, was trained to predict the next word in a sample of 40 gigabytes of internet text. The end result was the system generating text that “adapts...