feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Genetic effects of Chernobyl radiation

Researchers utilized genomic tools to investigate potential health effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, a known carcinogen, as a result of the 1986 Chernobyl accident. One study found no evidence that genetic changes associated with radiation exposure are passed to children, while the second study documented the genetic changes in the tumors of people who developed thyroid cancer after being exposed as children or fetuses to the...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness

Researchers showed that COVID-19 survivors -- including those not sick enough to be hospitalized -- have an increased risk of death in the six months following diagnosis with the virus. They also have catalogued the numerous diseases associated with COVID-19, providing a big-picture overview of the long-term complications of COVID-19 and revealing the massive burden this disease is likely to place on the world's population in the...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year

Every year, our planet encounters dust from comets and asteroids. These interplanetary dust particles pass through our atmosphere and give rise to shooting stars. Some of them reach the ground in the form of micrometeorites. An international program conducted for nearly 20 has determined that 5,200 tons per year of these micrometeorites reach the ground.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Scientists stunned to discover plants beneath mile-deep Greenland ice

Scientists found frozen plant fossils, preserved under a mile of ice on Greenland. The discovery helps confirm a new and troubling understanding that the Greenland Ice Sheet has melted entirely during recent warm periods in Earth's history -- like the one we are now creating with human-caused climate change. The new study provides strong evidence that Greenland is more sensitive to climate change than previously understood -- and at...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

How fast is the universe expanding? Galaxies provide one answer

Among the methods astronomers have found to measure the expansion rate of the local universe, the Hubble constant, surface brightness fluctuations is potentially one of the most precise. Scientists have now published the first good SBF estimate of the Hubble constant, pegging it at 73.3 km/s/Mpc: in the ballpark of other measurements of the local expansion, including the gold standard using Type Ia supernovae. The new estimate...

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Comet makes a pit stop near Jupiter's asteroids

After traveling several billion miles toward the Sun, a wayward young comet-like object orbiting among the giant planets has found a temporary parking place along the way. The object has settled near a family of captured ancient asteroids, called Trojans, that are orbiting the Sun alongside Jupiter. This is the first time a comet-like object has been spotted near the Trojan population.

feeds.sciencedaily.com feeds.sciencedaily.com

Gulf Stream System at its weakest in over a millennium

Never before in over 1000 years the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), also known as Gulf Stream System, has been as weak as in the last decades. Researchers compiled proxy data, reaching back hundreds of years to reconstruct the AMOC flow history. They found consistent evidence that its slowdown in the 20th century is unprecedented in the past millennium.