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A Practical Guide to Higher Order Functions in C#

If you have been programming for any length of time, you may well have come across higher order functions, but (like me) may not have fully appreciated just how powerful they can be. If you've not heard of them before, never fear, I have an explanation below. What are higher order functions? Simply put, a higher order function is a function whose input or output is also a function. In the following example, the Map function takes a...

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How to Get the Current Time in Python?

Table of Contents IntroductionMethod 1: Using The time Module❖ strftime❖ ctimeMethod 2: Using The datetime ObjectMethod 3: Using The pytz LibraryMethod 4: Using The Pendulum ModuleConclusion Introduction As a programmer, you need to work on different time-based tasks in your program like logging and saving the records to the database and accessing the documents. In each of those cases, date and time assume a significant part in...

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Python Operators Overview

What Are Python Operators? Python operators are special syntactical sugar to run basic operations without calling their respective methods. For example, you can use the + operator in a + b instead of the more clunky .add() method in a.add(b). Each operator has a unique symbol that is placed between the two arguments called operands. A simple example is given next where the + operator is applied to operands 40 and 2 to generate the sum...

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Custom bindings with Azure Functions .NET Isolated Worker

If you’re building workloads on Azure Functions, there’s a good chance you’ve looked at building custom bindings. Custom bindings can greatly reduce the boilerplate code you have to write in an Azure Function, so you can focus on the logic in your function instead. There are various examples of custom bindings out there, including several that I wrote while working on Indexing and searching NuGet.org with Azure Functions and...

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How To Use The map() Function In Dart

The Problem Recently, I was building a Flutter app and I needed to map over an array of users when a user logged in and check if their username, password, and security question answer matched what was in the database (the userArray). I tried to do something like this: var userArray = ['User 1', 'User 2', 'User 3']; userArray .map((user) => { if (user == 'User 1') { // log user in ...