techcrunch.com

Vuzix smart glasses get automatic facial recognition designed for law enforcement

This is one of those “I’m not surprised but I am slightly terrified” moments in tech development: Enterprise smart glasses company Vuzix announced Monday that it has developed new “fully autonomous” face recognition software in partnership with software developer NNTC. The new solution will work with Vuzix’s Blade smart glasses, which debuted at CES earlier this year and are positioned as both an enterprise and a consumer product. It’s called iFalcon Face Control Mobile, which is a mouthful, and it’s billed as an...

techcrunch.com

YouTube under fire for recommending videos of kids with inappropriate comments

More than a year on from a child safety content moderation scandal on YouTube and it takes just a few clicks for the platform’s recommendation algorithms to redirect a search for “bikini haul” videos of adult women towards clips of scantily clad minors engaged in body contorting gymnastics or taking an ice bath or ice lolly sucking “challenge.” A YouTube creator called Matt Watson flagged the issue in a critical Reddit post, saying he found scores of videos of kids where YouTube users are trading inappropriate comments and...

techcrunch.com

Facebook, Google and Twitter told to do more to fight fake news ahead of European elections

A first batch of monthly progress reports from tech giants and advertising companies on what they’re doing to help fight online disinformation have been published by the European Commission. Platforms including Facebook, Google and Twitter signed up to a voluntary EU code of practice on the issue last year. The first reports cover measures taken by platforms up to December 31, 2018. The implementation reports are intended to detail progress towards the goal of putting the squeeze on disinformation — such as by proactively identifying and...

techcrunch.com

Highlights from the Senate Intelligence hearing with Facebook and Twitter

Another day, another political grilling for social media platform giants. The Senate Intelligence Committee’s fourth hearing took place this morning, with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey present to take questions as U.S. lawmakers continue to probe how foreign influence operations are playing out on Internet platforms — and eye up potential future policy interventions.  During the session US lawmakers voiced concerns about “who owns” data they couched as “rapidly becoming me”. An uncomfortable...

hacker daily

Autonomous Terror: The Clear and Present Danger of Self-Driving Cars

Autonomous cars are one of the most exciting and transformative technologies currently under development. Fully autonomous vehicles would revolutionize transportation: decreasing costs, increasing safety, and improving quality of life for hundreds of millions of people who spend hours every day stuck in traffic.However, autonomous vehicles do present potential security risks which have been recognized for years.In 2014 the FBI Strategic Issues Group prepared a report warning that autonomous cars could be used as lethal weapons....

devopsonline.co.uk

PM demands tech companies delete extremist content

Technology companies face pressure regarding extremist content being uploaded since Saturday’s London terror attack. Prime Minister Theresa May has ordered terrorist ideology on the internet to be deleted before tech giants provide them a “safe space.” Google has spent hundreds of millions of pounds to tackle the issues and Twitter and Facebook are trying hard to delete and prevent terrorist activity and support, according to the BBC. Tech companies need to tackle extremist content in a similar way to how they removed indecent images of...

bigdata-madesimple.com

‘Big Data’ system can prevent terrorism, Abu Dhabi forum hears

The Big Data system filters the vast amount of information that now flows to governments and can then, potentially, prevent terrorist threats and cybercrime, experts say. “The volume, velocity and variety of data that is coming into an organisation is beyond its ability to gain any value from it,” said Rupert Hollin, a top security expert. “So if it is getting too much, too quickly – it is a big data problem.” He presented the concept to defence companies, including Tawazun, at an event in the capital on Wednesday. “If you’re...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Can big data predict the next cyber attack?

The battle to secure private data, whether financial information or intellectual property, may be won through big data analysis. That, at any rate is what Bob Griffin, cyber security firm RSA’s chief security architect, thinks. “The ability to take massive volumes of information and to get intelligence out of it is going to fundamentally change what we are doing as security professionals,” Griffin told The Jerusalem Post at the annual event of RSA’s parent company EMC in Las Vegas last week. As technology develops, he said, new areas...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Can big data transform social justice?

Target knows when you get pregnant. Facebook knows when you break up with someone. Google knows when you have been in a car accident. These are all (terrifying) consequences of our increasing lack of privacy. They are also results of the “big data” revolution that’s transforming our society. Whether you are a buyer, a seller or a hopeless romantic “researching” your old high school crush, chances are, some program is keeping track of all your clicks. This is what big data can do. By aggregating data from billions of people, analysts...

bigdata-madesimple.com

How Big Data Could Undo Our Civil-Rights Laws

Big Data will eradicate extreme world poverty by 2028, according to Bono, front man for the band U2. But it also allows unscrupulous marketers and financial institutions to prey on the poor. Big Data, collected from the neonatal monitors of premature babies, can detect subtle warning signs of infection, allowing doctors to intervene earlier and save lives. But it can also help a big-box store identify a pregnant teenager—and carelessly inform her parents by sending coupons for baby items to her home. News-mining algorithms might have been...

bigdata-madesimple.com

How lawyers and law firms operate in a Big Data world

Big data has sparked a revolution in how corporate America conducts research, identifies customers, advertises itself, and pursues profits. But just as big data has enormous implications for corporate clients, it has equally important consequences for the business and practice of law — business of law, meaning how firms are structured, managed and financed, and practice of law, meaning how attorneys perform legal work on behalf of clients. Compared to other modern professional services organizations, law firms generate very little actual...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Could Big Data Have Prevented the Fort Hood Shooting?

The federal government stopped funding a medical data screening program last year that researchers say might have prevented the Fort Hood shooting. Had Army Spec. Ivan Lopez been enrolled in the Durkheim Program, which uses an algorithm that mines social media posts for indicators of suicidal behavior, it might have picked up clues that a clinician could have missed in time for an intervention. “Given the highly agitated state of the shooter, we may have been able to get him help before acted, had he been in our system,” said Chris Poulin,...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Police think ‘Big’ in fight against petty crime

Local police are turning to information technology to help them combat a rising tide of petty theft in the city. At the heart of the latest crime-fighting campaign is the “Big Data” system set up by the Shanghai Public Security Bureau. Providing officers with up-to-date information about all manner of felonious activity — including the personal details of known offenders, a geographical breakdown of the city’s crime hot spots and a log of stolen goods — the database has become an essential tool in keeping villains off the city’s...

bigdata-madesimple.com

IBM Launches Counter Fraud Effort With New Software, Services

IBM launched new software and services to help organizations use Big Data and Analytics to address the $3.5 trillion lost each year to fraud and financial crimes. At an event to introduce its new Smarter Counter Fraud initiative here, IBM said through sophisticated business expertise and analytics, organizations can take a holistic approach to address the financial losses caused by fraud while protecting the value of their brand. IBM is drawing on the expertise and innovation from more than 500 fraud consulting experts, 290 fraud-related...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Big data analytics key to crime fighting, says Microsoft

Big data analytics is increasingly playing a role in the fight against cyber crime, according to Bryan Hurd, director of advanced analytics at Microsoft’s Digital Crimes Unit (DCU). “Big data analysis is how big problems are diagnosed and solved,” he told Computer Weekly at the Microsoft Cybercrime Center, the DCU’s world headquarters in Redmond, Washington. The facility, unveiled in November 2013, was set up as a centre of excellence to advance the global fight against cyber crime and enable the DCU to work more effectively with...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Big data – an opportunity or a threat in the fight against fraud?

It’s shocking to think that despite the UK losing an estimated £52billion to fraud annually, some businesses still bury their heads in the sand when it comes to confronting the problem, whether it comes from an internal or external threat. In times when people are rightly lauded as being companies’ top assets, it can be hard to apply some healthy scepticism around their integrity. Worse still, the prevailing view is that fraud is a neighbourhood problem; many executives think that it may happen to the company ‘next door’, but ‘not...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Tech heavyweights take on human trafficking with big data

Palantir Technologies, Google Inc. and other Silicon Valley companies are implementing digital tools to combat human trafficking, a scourge that’s been amplified by social media and mobile technologies invented here. Data analysis, image recognition and mapping programs are helping anti-trafficking nonprofits not only locate victims in real time, but predict their victimizers’ next moves. Going into 2014, the companies and their partners are exploring how to share information to develop global prevention strategies based on traffickers’...

bigdata-madesimple.com

Big Data and Law Enforcement: Was ‘Minority Report’ Right?

Big Data has always been around in some form or another. At some point, businesses decided to use that information to learn what makes their clients tick with phrases like “sales funnel analysis,” “actionable insights,” and “positive business impact.” So it stands to reason that Big Data was viewed through green (read: money) colored lenses. Somewhere along the line, however, someone realized that collecting and processing data doesn’t have to be for business purposes only, but also could be used to assist law enforcement. Maybe...