Roses are red, violets are—purple? Blue? Why not both! {{‘The Blur Markup Language’, ‘BML’}} allows {{‘writers’, ‘authors’}} to {{‘make’, ‘write’}} text which is lazily evaluated, freeing them from the {{‘requirement’, ‘assumption’}} that their words have to exist in any one {{‘static’, ‘fixed’}} form. Unlike more open-ended text generation approaches, BML allows the creation of {{‘tightly’, ‘precisely’}} composed texts rich with surprises and possibilities. We’ll explore the motivations behind chance poetry{{‘ and BML,’, ‘’}} and see how it’s being used in {{‘the wild’, ‘action’}} from books to essays to installations.

Andrew Yoon is making poems that change, live coding noise, playing melodica, growing the art journal nothing-to-say.org, and advocating for copyright abolition. He can be found online at andrewyoon.art

PUBLICATION PERMISSIONS:
Original video was published with the Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed). Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EReoVpb9LJo&t=10700s